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Discover George Malissard (1877-1942)

'Albert 1er, King of the Belgians'  Rare patinated bronze proof. 
Cast during the artist's lifetime dated 1922 - Dimensions: H 51.5 cm x W 52 cm x D 20 cm (excluding base) / H 5 cm x W 48 cm x D 18.5 cm (base only)

Born in 1877 in Auzin, from a large family of industrialists from the North, Georges Malissard is a self-taught French sculptor whose favorite theme is the horse.

Since childhood, he has been passionate about horses and practices horseback riding. He will therefore perform his service in a regiment of cuirassiers in Cambrai.

Dividing his time between his passion as a rider and that of a modeler, he practices with an amateur artist for whom it is said "he corrected the defects of an equestrian work, making a quality sculpture".

It was at the very beginning of the 20th century that he met, thanks to a friend of his father - very admiring of his gifts as a sculptor - the illustrious master Emmanuel Frémiet who strongly encouraged him to persevere. From then on, his decision is made, he will devote himself exclusively to sculpture. Very quickly, he began to exhibit in various exhibitions. Domestic or wild, various animal representations come to life in his agile hands. The equestrian subject, of which he understands perfectly the anatomy and the attitudes, will logically become his specialty.

As early as 1910, Kaiser Wilhelm II requested him to paint the portrait of his horses. It is the start of a success that will continue to grow. Then follows many requests from the great of this world: King George V, Alfonso XIII, Albert I, Marshals Lyauthey, Joffre, Foch and many others will be his sponsors. He will only work on order.

Georges Malissard passed away in 1942, leaving behind a cutting-edge work of great quality, now kept in museums and prestigious French and European collections.

 

Anecdote: over ten years ago, i had the chance to meet the sculptor's son. Announcing myself as a "merchant" during our first telephone exchange, the elegant but imposing man whom I will meet later around a coffee to discuss his father's work tells me point blank "that he 'had nothing to sell! ”. To that my answer was just as frank and the interview that followed lasted almost two hours ...


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